Shockwave-Sound Blog and Articles
August 2017 new royalty-free music selections

August 2017 new royalty-free music selections

It’s been almost two months since the last time we sent out one of these newsletters, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. 🙂 Okay, we took a couple of weeks of summer chill-out, but for the most part, we have been working on our music catalogue, in order to be able to provide you with the best stock music available, carefully curated and produced to the highest standards. Here is just a small selection of our latest additions:

Sweet & Flowery, Vol. 1:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/736/sweet-flowery-vol-1
The music here is all about candy, soda, cute little kids and summery fun.


Fantasy Worlds, Vol. 15:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/stock-music-collection/737/music-collection-fantasy-worlds-vol-15
The “Fantasy Words” series is some of our most popular and powerful music, suitable for grand adventures and grave dangers, in an adventure or fantasy setting.


Classical Chamber Strings, Vol. 2:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/738/music-collection-classical-chamber-strings-vol-2
A live performing string quartet, playing 16 of the most famous and loved classical pieces by Händel, Mussorgsky, Bach, Brahms and more – recorded live in the studio.


Classical Favorites, Vol. 7:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/739/music-collection-classical-favorites-vol-7
16 more timeless, classical jewels by Mendelssohn, Haydn, Strauss, Grieg, Mozart and more – with a full, large orchestra.


Vacations & Fun, Vol. 2:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/stock-music-collection/740/music-collection-vacations-fun-vol-2
Uplifting and refreshing sounds with a sense of adventure, exploration, fun and discovery.


Dark Cues, Vol. 10:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/stock-music-collection/741/music-collection-dark-cues-vol-10
15 tracks of cold, dark, eerie and disturbing music for horror flicks, thrillers, mysterious tales…


Emotional Underscores, Vol. 15:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/stock-music-collection/742/music-collection-emotional-underscores-vol-15
Music to tug at the heartstrings: These subtle, tasteful, fragile and reflective pieces lend themselves perfectly to stories on the human condition.


This is in no way a complete representation of all the new music we’ve released since our previous newsletter. These are just a few highlights. 🙂 We hope you enjoy them.

With all of our “CD collections” (as above), each track can also be licensed individually. Just click on the track title in the audio player at the bottom of the page, and you will be taken to that track’s individual track page, where you can license the track or any sub-version of it.

Please remember to “Like” our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/swsound/. And if you have any questions, issues, suggestions etc., please get in touch with us through the Contact page on our site. We are here and always happy to hear from you.

All the best from all of us at:
Shockwave-Sound.com

Classical Piano Favorites Vol. 2 – and why it’s so great!

Classical Piano Favorites Vol. 2 – and why it’s so great!

Classical Piano Favorites Vol. 2 (2016)

Dear customers, visitors, passers-by and everyone who might stumble across our site today..

Today at Shockwave-Sound.com we released our new album Classical Piano Favorites, Vol. 2. I just wanted to take a moment to write a few words about this album because I feel that this is not “just another classical piano album”. These days, with all the technology we have available and all of the amazing sounding samples and virtual instruments, it’s pretty easy for anybody to obtain sheet music of classical piano masterpieces, enter them into the computer, and export this as a pretty decent sounding recording of the piece in question.
However, we feel that this isn’t really the way to go, and especially so with calm and soothing classical piano works, because we feel that it’s vital to have the pieces performed by a human with some insight, some experience, some touch and sensibility as to what this beautiful music really is about and what it means to us.
This is why, for both of our Classical Piano Favorites Vol. 1, and Vol. 2, we decided to seek out the services of Vadim Chaimovich, a renowned and accomplished concert pianist. Vadim is a prize winning musician, originally from Lithuania, who studied the piano from the age of 5 and is today a popular concert pianist, traveling the world and playing to audiences’ great delight.
We were lucky enough to get Vadim on board with us, and for these projects he hired an amazing grand piano and had it tuned up especially for the recording sessions. He rehearsed for weeks and then recorded the album over a period of a few days, with top-of-the-line recording equipment in a pro studio. 
Because, well, if you’re going to do something, why not do it right?! We feel that these amazing compositions by Satie, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Bach, Chopin and many others deserve this kind of treatment from a true connoisseur of classical music.
Listen to the beautiful, unique and touching performances of our “Classical Piano Favorites” albums and we think that you’ll be amazed. Honestly, it’s quite unheard of, that performances and recordings of this quality is made available for “anyone” to license for such low license fees. (Starting from around $30 for a track or $100 for the whole album).
Classical Piano Favorites Vol. 1 (2015)
Focus on classical music this week

Focus on classical music this week

Good quality, royalty free classical music, is hard to come by. That’s just a fact.

Why? Because hiring an orchestra, with studio time and engineer, is extremely costly and time consuming. It’s a process that requires meticulous planning and preparation and costs “a small fortune” to get it done.

In the “stock music scene” there have been various sources of so-called royalty free classical music, of dubious origin. On some “free for all, self-uploading” websites, you can find classical music recordings that almost certainly don’t actually belong to the person who uploaded them, but rather sourced from some published CD, and belonging to another company.

If “some guy” is uploading fully orchestrated recordings of classical masterpieces, you need to ask yourself if that guy really spent the time, effort and money (possibly several hundreds of thousands of dollars) on getting that music recorded, so that he could sell it for $15 at a stock media site that allows a free-for-all self-uploading of content for sale. It goes without saying, that recording is not going to be safe, copyright wise.

Here at Shockwave-Sound.com we have also been exposed to these “unsafe” recordings, likely to be copyrighted to some company who doesn’t know that their recordings are being uploaded to stock music sites.

Instead, we focus on getting a smaller volume of recordings done, but to have them done from scratch, exclusively for our company. At the time of writing, we have 74 such exclusive classical recordings that we ourselves have organized and got recorded for us on a work-for-hire basis. We are adding to that regularly, so by the time you read this, we may have many more. These recordings are not for sale through any other stock music / royalty-free music website.

This week we decided to put some of these tracks together onto CD-collections. We have released 4 new Royalty-Free Classical Music albums this week, with the following track listings:

https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/612/classical-favorites-vol-1

Classical Favorites Vol 1:

  • Bach: Prelude No 1
  • Beethoven: FĂĽr Elise
  • Beethoven: Moonlight Sonata Movement 1
  • Delibes: Sylvia Pizzicato
  • Grieg: In The Hall of the Mountain King
  • Grieg: Morning Mood from Peer Gynt
  • Mozart: Eine Kleine Nachtmusik Allegro
  • Mozart: K545 Sonata in C Major Movement 1
  • Rossini: William Tell Overture
  • Purcell: Trumpet Tune for String Quartet
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/613/classical-favorites-vol-2
  • Satie: Gnossiene No 1
  • Satie: Gymnopedie No 1
  • Sousa: Semper Fidelis
  • Tchaikovsky: Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy from the Nutcracker
  • Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker Chinese Tea Dance
  • Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker Dance of the Mirlitons
  • Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker March
  • Händel: Sarabande
  • Purcell: Trumpet Tune
  • Schubert: Ave Maria
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/614/classical-favorites-vol-3
  • Vivaldi: Four Seasons Spring RV269 Movement 1 Allegro
  • Vivaldi: Four Seasons Spring RV269 Movement 3 Allegro pastorale
  • Vivaldi: Four Seasons Winter RV297 Movement 1 Allegro non molto
  • Vivaldi: Four Seasons Winter RV297 Movement 2 Largo
  • Chopin: Minute Waltz
  • Holst: Saturn from The Planets Suite
  • Sousa: Liberty Bell
  • Sousa: The Thunderer
  • Scott Joplin: The Entertainer
  • Saint-Saens: Aquarium from Carnival of the Animals
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/615/classical-favorites-vol-4
  • Strauss: The Blue Danube
  • Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake Act 1 Finale
  • Bach: Air On the G String
  • Bach: Jesu Joy of Mans Desiring
  • Bach: Wachet Auf aka Sleepers Awake BWV 140
  • Beethoven: Symphony 5 Movement 1
  • Elgar: Pomp and Circumstance March 1
  • Händel: Entrance of The Queen of Sheba
  • Händel: Hornpipe from Water Music
  • Holst: Jupiter from the Planets suite
Those were the 4 new releases we’ve put together this week. We already had the individual tracks in our catalog and have been acquiring them over a longer period of time, but it was only this week that we put them together into “CD-collections”.
From previously, we also have these two:
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/378/classical-strauss-lanner
  • Lanner Steyrische Tanze
  • Strauss An Der Schonen Blauen Donau
  • Strauss Annen Polka
  • Strauss Der Zigeunerbaron Overture
  • Strauss Die Fledermaus Overture
  • Strauss Dorfschwalben aus Osterreich
  • Strauss Gschichten aus dem Wienerwald
  • Strauss Kaiser Waltzer
  • Strauss Pizzicato Polka
  • Strauss Radetzky Marsch
  • Strauss Tritsch-Tratsch Polka
  • Strauss Unter Donner und Blitz
https://www.shockwave-sound.com/royalty-free-music-collection/571/classical-piano-favorites-vol-1 
  • Bach Prelude in C major BWV846
  • Beethoven Pathetique Sonata 2nd movement Adagio cantabile
  • Chopin Mazurka in A minor op. 17 no. 4
  • Chopin Mazurka in C sharp minor op. 63 no. 3
  • Chopin Nocturne in E flat major op. 9 no. 2
  • Chopin Nocturne no. 20 in C sharp minor op posth
  • Chopin Prelude in E minor op. 28 no. 4
  • Chopin Raindrops Prelude op. 28 no. 15
  • Liszt Consolation no. 3 in D flat major S.172
  • Mendelssohn Song Without Words in E major op. 19 no. 1
  • Mozart Piano Sonata no. 12 K332 2nd movement Adagio
  • Schubert Impromptu in G-flat major op. 90 no. 3 D899
  • Schubert Moment musicaux in F minor no. 3 op. 94 D780
  • Schumann Dreaming from Scenes from Childhood op. 15 no. 7
  • Scriabin Etude in C sharp minor op. 2 no. 1
  • Tchaikovsky June (Barcarolle) from The Seasons op. 37a no. 6
We hope you enjoy the music, safe in the knowledge that they can be licensed for use in media and in public, without fear of copyright infringement.
Keeping track of music copyrights – the difference between Sound Recording ownership and Composition ownership

Keeping track of music copyrights – the difference between Sound Recording ownership and Composition ownership


We received a question by email today which I set about answering in the shortest and clearest way I could. I think it could be a useful piece of information for anybody looking to “use” music in any way, be it for school, for your company, in a public place, and so on.

So the question was something along the lines of:

“I’m going teach music in an online course, it’s a school project. I’ll be playing the music myself. Do I need  to buy license? Or can I just go ahead and do that, without paying anybody anything?”

And the answer is:

Whenever you want to use music for anything other than just personal listening, there are two copyrights to think about: (1) the composition, (2) the sound recording.

Let’s start with looking at the sound recording. I understand that you just wish to play the music yourself, and not use existing sound recordings. So the sound recordings will be of you yourself playing your instrument(s), which means that you in fact will own the sound recording.

Then there is the composition. Any composer who has composed a piece of music automatically owns the copyright to that composition. If you want to distribute, play in public or in any other way exploit a piece of music that another person has composed, you need to get permission/license from that person or his representative.

However, when a composer dies, 70 years* pass and then the composition turns into Public Domain. The copyright in the composition “goes away” 70 years* after the death of the composer. So if you are dealing with traditional folk songs or classical music that was composed hundreds of years ago, there are no copyrights in the compositions.

(* The period of 70 years is correct for USA. For other countries, the period may be longer or shorter. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries%27_copyright_length for a list of how long it takes, in different countries, from a composer dies until his compositions turns into Public Domain.)

The composition in the sound recording never expires in the same way as the composition does. There is no period of time after which the sound recording turns to Public Domain. It never does. It continues to be owned by the sound recording copyright owner in perpetuity.

If you are not using existing/copyrighted sound recordings, and you are not using compositions that are under copyright, then you don’t need a license of any sort. You can just go ahead and play, record and distribute the music as you wish.

However, if you are going to use a sound recording that already exists, or use a composition that is still under copyright, then you need to obtain a license for that.

Timeline of classical composers

Timeline of classical composers

by Paul Virostek for Shockwave-Sound.com

Timeline 1 – Renaissance & Baroque period

 

Featuring the following classical composers: Cipriano De Rore, Giulio Caccini, Gregorio Allegri, Philipp Friedrich Boddecker, Diedrich Buxtehude, Johann Pachelbel, Henry Purcell, Francois Couperin, Tomaso Albinoni, Jeremiah Clarke, Antonio Lucio Vivaldi, Georg Philipp Telemann, Jean-Joseph Mouret, George Frideric Händel, Johann Sebastian Bach, Benedetto Marcelo, Francesco Geminiani, Jean-Baptiste Senaille, Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Joseph Bodin de Boismortier, Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, Cristoph Willibald Gluck, Georg Matthias Monn, Michal Kazimierz Oginski, Franz Joseph Haydn, Johann Baptist Vanhal.

Timeline 2 – Classical period


Featuring the following classical composers: Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Joseph Bodin de Boismortier, Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, Christoph Willibald Gluck, Georg Matthias Monn, Michal Mazimierz Oginski, Frans Joseph Haydn, Johann Baptist Vanhal, Luigi Boccherini, Carl Stamitz, Dmitry Bortniansky, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Luigi Cherubini, Ludwig van Beethoven, Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Niccolo Paganini, Carl Maria von Weber, Gioacchino Rossini, Saverio Mercadante, Aleksander Gribodeyov, Gaetano Donizetti, Franz Peter Schubert, Jules-Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges, Vincenzo Bellini, Josef Lanner, Adolphe Adam, Louis Hector Berlioz, Johann Strauss I, Michael Glinka, Felix Mendelssohn

 

Timeline 3 – Romantic period, part 1


Featuring the following classical composers: Ludwig van Beethoven, Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Niccolo Paganini, Carl Maria von Weber, Gioacchino Rossini, Saverio Mercadante, Aleksander Griboyedov, Gaetano Donizetti, Franz Peter Schubert, Jules-Henri Vernoy de Saint-Georges, Vincenzo Bellini, Josef Lanner, Adolphe Adam, Louis Hector Berlioz, Johann Strauss I, Mikhail Glinka, Felix Meldelssohn, Robert Schumann, Frederic Chopin, Franz Liszt, Guiseppe Verdi, Richard Wagner, Charles-Francois Gounod, Jacques Offenbach, Franz von Suppe, Giovanni Bottesini, Bedrich Smetana, Johann Strauss II, Ludwig Minkus, Luigi Luzzi, Anton Rubinstein, Alexander Borodin, Johannes Brahms, Amilcare Ponchielli, Charles Camille Saint-Saens, Henryk Wieniawski, Leo Delibes, Georges Bizet, Max Bruch, Modest Mussorgsky, Piotr Tchaikovsky, Antonin Leopold Dvorak

 

Timeline 4- Romantic period, part 2


Featuring the following classical composers: Jules Massenet, Edvard Grieg, Pablo de Sarasate, Paolo Tosti, Richard Franz Joseph Heuberger, John Philip Sousa, Anatoly Liadov, Edward William Elgar, Giacomo Puccini, Gustav Mahler, Anton Arensky, Paul Dukas, Alexander Glazunov, Dmitry Allemenov, Vittorio Monti, Alexander Scriabin, Gustav Holst, Ottorini Respighi, Reinhold Gliere, Pavel Chesnokov, George Gershwin