shockwave-sound.com
View Cart | License | Blog | Contact
[ Home ][ Testimonials ][ Help/FAQ ][ Affiliate program ][ CD collections ][ My tags ][ My orders ][ Custom music ]

Three Ways to Build a Sound Library

by Paul Virostek

 


What’s the best way for a new field recordist to begin building a sound library? How can a sound designer grow a folders of scattered samples into a collection with heft and weight?

Huge sound clip libraries roam the Web. Some have tens of thousands of sound effects. New sound pros are easily intimidated. Perhaps you want to sell your sound clips on the Internet. Maybe you just want to grow your collection to use in your own projects. How can you grow a similar sound library? Most of us don’t have thousands of dollars to spend doing so.

I know the feeling. I began building my sound library of with only a handful of DAT tapes. Now it numbers over 20,000 samples. You can do this, too.

So, today I’ll share three ways to start building a sound library. I’ll explain the difficulties, how to avoid them, and the pros and cons of each method.

What You Need to Get Started

What do you need to start a sound collection?

A good library demands endless intangible qualities: ideas, creativity, flexibility, and originality. We’ll look at things more directly, though. What tools do you need to begin building a good collection?

  • Gear.
  • Sound isolation.
  • Original recordings and copyright.
  • Cash.
  • Time.

Your choice of the following three options depends on how much of these you have, and want to use.

1. Do It All Yourself

The simplest way to get started is to do everything yourself. This means you’ll provide the gear. You’ll shape the recording space (whether a sound booth, or a clean atmosphere outside). You’ll find the cash to fund everything, and the time to get things done.

The major benefit of this option is control. You can record in your home at two in the morning. There’s no need to schedule studio time, or rely on assistants to show up.

And, since you produce every clip, you’ll own all of them. You can twist them, remix them, or even give them away however you like. Your collection will be perfectly legal and 100% yours.

Many recordists on a budget are able to find free software and plug-ins to achieve the same effect as commercial options. You’re free to adapt your home for the best recordings: shut off the HVAC, unplug the fridge, and so on.

Just the same, the recording environment won’t be as pristine as a studio. That may mean you’ll have to alter what you record. For example, you may not be able to record quiet props. Loud, more prominent recordings will work well, however. You may wish to focus on exterior atmospheres, too. Just ensure a substandard recording space doesn’t sacrifice the quality of your recordings. Sound isolation and quality are extremely important for a high-quality collection.

Pros
• You learn a lot.
• You improve your craft.
• You have complete control.
• The only expense is time.

Cons
• Lack of sophisticated equipment.
• Possibly a noisy environment.
• Takes longer.

2. Record in a Studio

Major cities will have dozens of recording studios. They’ll feature the latest software, and plug-ins. They’ll stock a mixture of modern equipment and classic vintage gear. These studios will be soundproof, and acoustically treated. This allows you to capture delicate, quiet sounds. This is a good choice to ensure you have clean recordings. You also have access to superior microphones.

However, this benefit comes with a cost. Studios are expensive. Research options. Big studios charge $200 an hour. There are cheaper, smaller studios that charge as low as $50 an hour. Weekend rates are cheaper. Night rates are cheaper still.

 

If you decide to work this way, make sure that you are fully prepared. Make a list of everything you want to record. Gather all your props beforehand. This means you will need less time in the studio to record what you need. That makes it cheaper.

It’s a good idea to explain to the engineer that you must own all recordings. Most of the time they don’t care. They’re selling the space, not the artistic work. It’s critical to have this discussion, nonetheless.
Do you have your own recorder? Comfortable choosing and arranging microphones? Record everything yourself. Inform the facility you don’t need an engineer. This will save a bit more in studio costs.

Remember to bring your own hard drive. Don’t use theirs. Others may use the studio later, and mistakenly use sound effects you own.
This option resolves the fragile recording process itself. Once the recordings are captured you can return to your home studio and master all the final clips yourself.

Pros
• Professional, modern equipment.
• Pristine recording space.
• Engineer’s expertise with acoustics, microphone quality, and so on.
• Creative advice from a sound pro. Collaboration.

Cons
• Need to pay whenever you want to record.
• Dependent on others.
• Must ensure ownership of files with studio.

3. Hire an Artist.

A third option is to pay someone else to build a sound library for you. There are hundreds of sound pros that are happy to record or design sound effects for your collection. These pros are highly-talented people that will deliver superior recordings.

In this case, you’ll send them a list of tracks you need. You may choose from a selection of existing tracks and “buy out” the rights to own them yourself. The fee for this will be based on an hourly rate, a bulk package, or a price based on quantity.

This is a quick, effortless way to build your sound library. An appealing side effect of hiring others is that they’ll provide a fresh take on sound recording.

There are two issues, however.

First, this is usually expensive. The cost of labour makes it a bit too pricey. You may never make up the costs of two days of artist labour in sound effect sales. You may find someone cheaply, though. That is key. Perhaps you can hire a talented film school student and a lower rate.
The second issue is that your freelancer must sign a contract transferring ownership of the work to you. This is called work-for-hire. This ensures you own the creations, can use them in your own projects, and resell them if you like.

It’s important to realize that you’re working with creators, just like you. You have worked hard to create your own tracks, and they are precious to you. The freelancers you hire will feel the same. Most artists are reluctant to give up ownership of their creations. They’re usually emotionally invested in them. It’s completely understandable.

This arrangement certainly can work, however, you just need to make the issue of ownership clear. Tell them you are buying out the sounds, and that you plan to sell them later. Mention this before you begin the work. This ensures everyone is beginning the project with the same understanding.

Pros
• Fast.
• High-quality, professional work.
• Fresh recordings.


Cons
• Expensive.
• Creative ownership must be guaranteed.
• Must ensure freelancers own the copyright of the clips they are selling you.

Which Do You Choose?

No single option is better than the other. Instead, your best choice is the balance of cash, time, and availability to sound isolation and gear that works for you. Your choice may be influenced by people, too. Are you more comfortable working alone, or do you like bouncing ideas off of others? Perhaps you feel it’s easier to let someone else do all the work instead. Involving others can be inspiring. It adds expense, but saves time.

Be aware that beginning a sound library is a long journey. It takes time to record and polish sound effects. The initial up-front investment in time and cash is real, however it will pay off handsomely over the years of your sound career. Use these three options to begin your sound library now. Why?

A strong collection represents your skill and inspiration in every clip you record, master, and publish. As your sound library grows, it will become involved in every project you join, amplify it, and share your creativity with all that hear your work.

About the author: Paul Virostek travels worldwide recording the sounds of cities and cultures. He shares his collection at airbornesound.com, and writes about his experiences field recording, and sharing sound effects at jetstreaming.org. He is also the author of "Field Recording: from Research to Wrap - An Introduction to Gathering Sound Effects", which was published in 2012.
Other articles you may find useful:
Asset Management: How to keep track of sound clips using metadata and cataloguing. Three ways to build a sound library: Record sounds yourself, or find another way. Timeline of classical composers: Get an overview of the lives and times of classical music maestros. Depth and space in the mix, part 1: How to use reverb, pre-delay, EQ and delay to make your mix better. Depth and space in the mix, part 2: Further tips on improving the sound of your productions. Maximizing composer agreements: How you as a composer for games and other media can get the best out of the contract.
YouTube and music use: How "fingerprinted music" is causing advertisements on your YouTube video. Using Reverb to enhance your production: John Radford on the use and abuse of Reverb in music. Do the work: Music composers' tips and strategies for overcoming procrastination and getting the job done. Sound effects in music composition: How you can use sound FX in music production for games, film, media. Mixing as part of the composing process - part 1: Planning your instrumentation and approach. Mixing as part of the composing process - part 2: Making your sounds and instruments work with your composition to best effect.
Sound for picture - Faking it: Some great tips on making your audience feel they are there. Royalty Free music in 24-bit: Why we are upgrading to High Definition music downloads. Choosing music for a short film project: We look at some options for obtaining your musical score. Choosing music for a Documentary: Help and tips for obtaining your film soundtrack. Tips and Curiosities from Computer Game Music, pt 1: Piotr Koczewski discusses video game music. Tips and Curiosities from Computer Game Music, pt 2: More talk about composing music for video games.
Copyrights in Classical music and Public Domain music: We try to explain why "public domain music" still has rights attached to it. 1 year Shockwave-Sound.com exclusive: Some of our best music can be found only at Shockwave-Sound.com first year. Browse royalty-free music super quick: With our free Demo DVD-ROM you can skim through tracks quickly on your own PC. Getting started with voiceover: Things you need to know if you would like to make a living as a professional voice talent. Sennheiser PXC 450 noise canceling headphones: Video review of these classy noise reducing headphones Surviving your first composing gig: How to handle your client when composing music for video games or film/TV.
Creating radio ads with music and voice: We discuss some good practices and neat tricks for a great sounding ad spot. Recording sound for perspective: Good sound recording practice for a realistic result. Making a long-playing sound or Audio-CD starting out from a short, looping sound file. Creative workflow in Sonar, part 1: Save time and frustration while working in Sonar music production. Surround music in video games: Rob Bridgett discusses the viability and aesthetics of 5.1 sound heaven Shockwave-Sound's sister site for sound-fx
We introduce our new site for listening to and buying sound effects.
Cue the Music, Part 1: Using copyrighted music in your project or presentation Cue the Music, Part 2: We look at Five ways to get music for your project without breaking copyrights. Cue the Music, Part 3: How to use Royalty Free Music to the best effect for your project. Working with audio in Sony Vegas, Part 1: Importing & Timestretching audio files Working with audio in Sony Vegas, Part 2: Adding FX, Mixing & Rendering Audio Files Samson Zoom H4 portable recorder: An in-depth product review of this handy sound recording unit.
How to get music on your web site: We explain how to Embed music on a web page and how to make a Flash that plays music. Music rights terms and expressions: Podcast safe music, Sync License, Royalty Free Music, Performance Rights... Confused yet? Royalty free music explained: What really lies behind this term? We talk a little music licensing history and look at this expression. How to build a music track from loops: Do this to get the "set of music loops" to play as a longer music track YouTube Safe Music: How to find music for your YouTube video and properly credit the composer and publisher. Common myths and misunderstandings about music rights: We try to clear up some of these.
Orchestral MIDI arrangement: A beginner's guide to the Orchestral MIDI Mockup. A guide to virtual pianos: We take a look (and a very close listen) to virtual piano plug-ins. Strengthen your 3D animation with audio: How to use royalty-free music and sound-fx with 3D animation Ideas for Effectively Using Sibelius and Pro Tools 8: We look at ways to streamline and optimize your composing work. Cleaning up noisy dialogue: Get rid of background noise and improve sound quality of voice recordings Interactive Music in Games: We look at ways to make videogame music react and respond to the players actions.
Writing music for games, part 1: Video games composer Kole on some issues to keep in mind. Writing music for games, part 2: Kole dissects another video game music project. Writing music for games, part 3: Finding a way to compose music for Facebook games and stay within the boundaries. Writing music for games, part 4: How to make the most of what little resources you have available.   Music Production hardware and software tips, part 1: Important issues you need to consider when selecting your tools, computer, CPU, RAM, software etc.
Music Production hardware and software tips, part 2: Useful tips for choosing your hardware for music production. Composing music for cellphones / mobile phones - Part 1: Tips and tricks of the trade. Composing music for mobile phones / cellphones - Part 2: More useful info for producers. Observations of Memorable Themes: We discuss music composition and how to make your melodies memorable. Developing musical ideas in video games - Part 1. Ways of making the music work for the game. Developing musical ideas in video games - Part 2. More thoughts on scoring music for video games.
Ideas for creating unique musical colours: Tips to try to make it sound and feel 'different' Choosing the right classical music, part 1: We recommend 10 pieces of bombastic, powerful, awe inspiring classical music. Choosing the right classical music, part 2: In this part we recommend 10 beautiful, soft, heavenly and emotional classical music tracks      

Would you like to contribute an article to Shockwave-Sound.com? We will pay you $150.00, and we will include your bio, a link to your web site, and if you wish, a quick plug of your product or service. Shockwave-Sound.com is used by almost 4,000 unique visitors every day. Contact us if you have an article idea/pitch for us that you feel is useful, relevant and well written. First, though, you may want to read this blog post about article requirements.

Copyright notice: This article and all other text on this web site is under Copyright to Shockwave-Sound.com. This text may not be copied, re-printed, re-published, in print or electronically, in whole or in part, without written permission from Shockwave-Sound.com.

[Switch to Classic Navigation]